Elisabeth Eitel

Elisabeth
Eitel

Elisabeth Eitel is Senior Editor of Machine Design magazine. She has a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Fenn College at Cleveland State University. For 13 years, Elisabeth has worked as a technical writer — recently as Chief Editor of Motion System Design magazine.
Her blog is Product Design Engineering — existing and emerging technologies immediately applicable to product design, as well as industry trends that promise to change engineering. Follow her on Google+ and Twitter.

Articles
MarkForged: $5,000 3D printer prints carbon-fiber parts
Startup company MarkForged is now selling $5,000 3D printers that print carbon-fiber parts. Called the Mark One, the printers will start shipping in later in 2014.
Gallery: The engineering of U.S. Olympic Sochi bobsleds
In this photo gallery, we show how the U.S. Olympic two-man bobsleds from BMW and four-man bobsleds from Bo-Dyn Bobsled Project Inc. are designed.
Simulation predicts battery heat

Most hybrid vehicles today use Li-ion batteries, but heat is a major challenge. If cells in a battery pack become too hot, controls often protect them from damage by taking the car off battery power and switching it to the combustion engine.

Summary of SolidWorks' new Mechanical Conceptual software (in pictures)
At the recent SolidWorks World 2014, Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp., Waltham, Mass., promoted their new Mechanical Conceptual software, a suite designed to leverage cloud computing to “accelerate your concept design for … faster time-to-market.” Here we show you some images of the software to illustrate what it does exactly.
Gallery: Stratasys' new full-color, multi-material 3D printer announced at SolidWorks World 2
Last night, 3D-printer maker Stratasys Ltd., Eden Prairie, Minn., released the Objet500 Connex3 3D printer — the first and only printer available that can print in color and make composite parts out of multiple materials. Here we show you some of what the Connex3 can do.
Technology forecast 2014: Robots priced for the masses 3
Non-industrial robots are getting better at executing modest to moderately complicated tasks and their numbers are on the rise thanks to new design approaches, open-source controls and hardware, forgiving actuators, and 3D-printed linkages.
Scenes from Autodesk University 2013
Autodesk University 2013 shapes up to be an educational and inspirational event.
Just in: Autodesk computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) on the cloud 2
Today at Autodesk University in Las Vegas, Autodesk Inc. announced that they're now offering a product called CAM 360, cloud-based computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) software.
Quick primer on pulse-ranging technology (PRT) sensors 2
During operation, a PRT sensor emits bursts of light that reach the object, bounce off, and come back to the sensor’s receiver. Here we outline common applications.
Tags from 3D-printed molds swim with sharks
New animal-tracking tags are cast from 3D-printed molds to better conform to animals’ bodies. 3D printing makes the complex organic shapes no costlier to build than plain geometric parts.
HMIs make packagers more flexible
One food-industry manufacturer and contract packager — Crest Foods — is integrating human-machine interfaces (HMIs) and unifying HMI software into their packaging machines to make them more modern and flexible.
The rise of soft robots and the actuators that drive them
Now, yielding robots — those that shift from their equilibrium position when a disturbance force is applied — are promising to bring robotics costs down.
Electric bike balances pedal and motor torque 4

A pedal-electric (pedelec) bike uses a special sensor to synchronize power from an electric motor with that of human pedaling for a smooth, power-assisted ride.

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