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SIX SIGMA ICRA LEADERSHIP FOCUS

  

Market

Business

Product

Process

 

Innovation

Innovating market needs

Innovating business strategy

Innovating product concepts

Innovating process methods

G3 Goals

Configuration

Configuring market channels

Configuring business operations

Configuring product features

Configuring process steps

G2 Gates

Realization

Realizing market sales

Realizing business return

Realizing product yield

Realizing process cycles

G1 Gains

Attenuation

Attenuating market recoil

Attenuating business cost

Attenuating product defects

Attenuating process variation

G0 Gaps

    

Focus of previous Six Sigma efforts

 

Previous generations of Six Sigma concentrated on the functions depicted in the bottom right-hand portion of this diagram. Gen III broadens the focus beyond just product and process, to include business and market factors. Moreover, Gen III organizes Six Sigma along the lines of four stages represented by the acronym ICRA. ICRA can apply to all four areas depicted in the matrix through Six Sigma projects run by White Belts from each respective function.


SIX SIGMA STEWARDSHIP ROLE DESCRIPTIONS

ROLE

DESCRIPTION FOCUSMISSION

Advocate

A person who advances, defends, or maintains a cause to assure continuing focus.

Value-centric

Sustain the idea of Six Sigma and keep its credibility strong.

Coach

A person who provides intensive training to develop new knowledge and skills.

Skill-centric

Transfer critical subject matter knowledge to Six Sigma X-belts.

Mentor

A person who provides trusted counseling or guidance to enhance role development.

Role-centric

Enhance the professional status and capability of Six Sigma X-belts.

Leader

A person who has commanding influence to informally compel action.

Team-centric

Guide and motivate teams to the realization of Six Sigma objectives.

Enabler

A person who makes something possible or feasible to realize a particular end.

Opportunity-centric

Eliminate roadblocks that impede the progress of Six Sigma activities.

Facilitator

A person who aids or assists in a process to by make things easier or more convenient.

Action-centric

Increase the ease and efficiency which Six Sigma activities are realized.

Manager

A person who has formal authority to exercise operational control over resources.

Resource-centric

Create plans and deliver resources to support Six Sigma activities.

Consultant

A person who gives professional advice or services to support certain activities.

Problem-centric

Provide subject matter expertise in support of Six Sigma activities.

One advantage of Gen III is that it extends the idea of Six Sigma stewardship to a broader cross section of individuals than could be the case previously. Gen III White Belts can be advocates of the Six Sigma principles and provide continuity for future efforts. A result is that the organization tends to retain more tribal knowledge about conducting improvement efforts.


How Six Sigma has evolved

During the 1980's, Six Sigma was a defect-centric initiative at Motorola. It was a methodology specifically formulated to make quantum improvements in product quality by way of defect reduction. This era is often loosely referred to as the first generation of Six Sigma, or SSG1 for short. Then, in the 1990s, the focus of Six Sigma shifted from product quality to business quality. In this sense, Six Sigma became a business-centric system of management. It was General Electric Corp. that ushered in the second generation of Six Sigma, or SSG2 as it is now known.

By the new millennium, the business-minded nature of Six Sigma was once again being retextured. The focus and locus expanded to include not only the customer, but the provider as well. On the leading edge of this evolving landscape was DuPont Corp. DuPont first adopted the focus of value creation in a meaningful and global way.

The new emphasis for Six Sigma began to emerge from experiences at DuPont. This emphasis was subsequently summarized by Mikel Harry into the 4Gs of value creation — Growth, Gates, Gains, and Gaps. This scheme stressed the value-based nature of a business and that there is value entitlement in every aspect of the business relationship.

This value-centric mission was formalized in 2002 as a strategic roadmap called ICRA: Innovation, Configuration, Realization, and Attenuation. From this strategy emerged the 16 core competencies of a world-class business. ICRA with the big ideas of value creation combined to marshal in the third generation of Six Sigma, now called SSG3.

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