It also solves the problems of how to handle the nonorthogonal nature of touches, how to adjust for the force variations during touch duration, and provides a durable touch surface. It uses force-based touch sensing, measuring the force of a touch rather than using a complex, indirect measurement. The location and force of the touch can be quickly and accurately determined by placing four force sensors near the corners of the touch surface. Relatively simple mathematical equations can be used to determine the X-Y location of the touch and the corresponding Z-axis force. The touch panel resists impacts of more than 1,400 g. The touch surface can consist of multiple materials or elevated and irregular surfaces. The device dynamically self-calibrates, is scalable to any size, proven up to 1.2 m, supports two-sided display, is usable with various elevations: flat plane, curved surface, 3D surface, projected surface, or a surface with holes, such as a speaker; is touchable with a finger, gloved hand, stylus, or other object, is operable when covered with ice, water, dust or debris, and is capable of capturing signatures.

QSI Corp., 2212 S.W. Temple #50, Salt Lake City, UT 84115, (801) 466-8770, forcepaneltechnology.com