Sparking interest in welding and electronics
For the past three years, Calhoun Community College has been sparking the interest of area high school girls in nontraditional, high-wage careers in welding and electrical technology. The weeklong 3rd annual Summer Welding and Electrical Technology (SWeETy) camp gives girls the opportunity to learn hands-on about technical skills that can lead to high-paying careers in these high-growth industries. Campers participate in instructor-led projects, field trips, and interact with women role models during industry-sponsored lunches. These help the girls develop both problem-solving and teamwork skills.

“The students are challenged to break down stereotypes that may deter girls from pursuing technical professions by introducing them to successful women who currently work in nontraditional fields and by offering them a number of convincing reasons why girls should consider technical careers,” commented camp coordinator Gwen Baker.

Jim Swindell, associate dean for technology education at Calhoun says, “By introducing these career options to young women still in high school, we hope to guide them early on into the math and science courses they will need to prepare them for earning a degree or certificate in these high-demand, high-paying fields.”

The camp receives support from the local chamber of commerce, as well as area business and industry who know the importance of investing in the workforce of the future.

Engineering Student of the Year
Boeing will once again sponsor the annual Engineering Student of the Year Award, in association with Flight International magazine. The award will be presented in November during the Flightglobal Achievement Awards at the Dubai Airshow.

In its fourth year, the worldwide competition is open to any full or parttime engineering student pursuing a recognized degree. The winning entry will be deemed to be the most likely to impact the future of aerospace engineering in areas such as new or enhanced capabilities, systems, processes or tools; new levels of performance; and improved life-cycle costs.

“Engineering innovation is the heart and soul of the aerospace industry, and Boeing is committed to engaging and developing the work force that will solve the challenges of tomorrow,” said Charles Toups, vice president of Integrated Defense Systems Engineering and Mission Assurance. “This award spotlights outstanding students whose work holds potential for the future of aeronautics, engineering, and space technology, and who will one day lead our industry to new levels of achievement.”

A record number of entries were received last year from around the world. The winner, Agnes Blom, a Dutch doctoral student in aerospace engineering at Delft University of Technology, was recognized for her research in the development of advanced, fiber-steered, variable-stiffness composite laminates.

For more information or to submit an entry, visit www.flightglobal.com/student.